Tennessee National Parks


Big South Fork NRRA

Stones River National Battlefield

 

Andrew Johnson National Historic Site - Andrew Johnson National Historic Site honors the life and work of the nation's 17th President and preserves his two homes, tailor shop, and grave site. Andrew Johnson's life exemplifies many struggles faced by Americans today. He worked his way from tailor to President. He stood strong for his ideals and beliefs. His presidency, from 1865 - 1869, illustrates the United States Constitution at work following Lincoln's assassination and during attempts to reunify a nation that had been torn by civil war. His work helped shape the future of the United States and his influences continue today.

Appalachian National Scenic Trail - The Appalachian National Scenic Trail is a 2,167-mile (3,488 km) footpath along the ridge crests and across the major valleys of the Appalachian Mountains from Katahdin in Maine to Springer Mountain in north Georgia. The trail traverses Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Maryland, West Virginia, Virginia, Tennessee, North Carolina and Georgia. 

Big South Fork National River and Recreation Area - The free-flowing Big South Fork of the Cumberland River and its tributaries pass through 90 miles of scenic gorges and valleys containing a wide range of natural and historic features. The area offers a broad range of recreational opportunities including camping, whitewater rafting, kayaking, canoeing, hiking, horseback riding, mountain biking, hunting and fishing.

Fort Donelson National Cemetery - In July 1862, Congress passed legislation giving the President of the United States the authority to purchase land for the establishment of cemeteries "for the soldiers who shall die in the service of their country." This legislation effectively began the National Cemetery system.  In 1867, Fort Donelson National Cemetery was established as the final resting place of Union soldiers killed at Fort Donelson.

Fort Donelson National Battlefield - Fort Donelson National Battlefield includes: Fort Donelson National Cemetery (established 1867) the final resting place for Union soldiers killed at Fort Donelson, and American veterans representing seven wars, visitor center, the Dover Hotel (Surrender House), an adaptive restoration of the historic building where confederate general Simon B. Buckner surrendered to Ulysses S. Grant, and Fort Donelson with associated earthen rifle pits and river batteries.

Obed Wild and Scenic River - Approximately 45 miles of wild and scenic river are comprised of the Obed River, Clear Creek, Daddy's Creek and Emory River. These water courses have cut rugged gorges leaving exciting whitewater gorges with bluffs as high as 500 feet above the water.

Overmountain Victory National Historic Trail - The Overmountain Victory National Historic Trail follows the Revolutionary War route of Patriot militia men from Virginia, today's eastern Tennessee, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Georgia to the battle of Kings Mountain, South Carolina, site of the Kings Mountain National Military Park.

Shiloh National Cemetery - Shiloh National Cemetery was established in 1866 and has more than 3,500 Union graves. In 1933 responsibility of the cemetery was transferred from the War Department to the National Park Service.

Shiloh National Military Park - Shiloh National Military Park was established in 1894 to preserve the scene of the first major battle in the Western theater of the Civil War. The two-day battle, April 6 and 7, 1862, involved about 65,000 Union and 44,000 Confederate troops. This battle resulted in nearly 24,000 killed, wounded, and missing. It proved to be a decisive victory for the federal forces when they advanced on and seized control of the Confederate railway system at Corinth, Mississippi. The battlefield contains about 4,000 acres and has within its boundaries the Shiloh National Cemetery along with the well preserved prehistoric Indian mounds that are listed as a historic landmark.

Stones River National Cemetery - Stones River National Cemetery was established in 1865 and has more than 6,000 Union graves. In 1933 responsibility of the cemetery was transferred from the War Department to the National Park Service.

Stones River National Battlefield - A fierce battle took place at Stones River between December 31, 1862 and January 2, 1863. General Bragg's Confederates withdrew after the battle, allowing General Rosecrans and the Union army to control middle Tennessee. Although the battle was tactically indecisive, it provided a much-needed boost to the North after the defeat at Fredericksburg. 

 

 

For more information visit the National Park Service website   

 

 

 

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