North Dakota National Parks

Knife River Indian Villages National Historic Site
Knife River Indian Villages National Historic Site
Theodore Roosevelt National Park
Theodore Roosevelt National Park

 

Fort Union Trading Post National Historic Site - John Jacob Astor's American Fur Company built Fort Union Trading Post in 1828 near the junction of the Missouri and Yellowstone rivers in what is now North Dakota. The post soon became headquarters for trading bison hides and other furs with the Assiniboin Indians to the north, the Crow Indians on the upper Yellowstone and the Blackfeet who lived farther up the Missouri.

Knife River Indian Villages National Historic Site - Knife River Indian Villages National Historic Site was established October 26, 1974. The 1,758 acre site preserves historic and archaeological remnants of the culture and agricultural lifestyle of the Northern Plains Indians. More than fifty archaeological sites suggest a possible 8,000 year span of inhabitation, ending with five centuries of Hidatsa earth lodge village occupation. The circular depressions at the three village sites are up to 40 feet in diameter and are a silent testimony to the people that lived here.

Lewis and Clark National Historic Trail - This site celebrates the heroic expedition of the Corps of Discovery, led by Captain Meriwether Lewis and Captain William Clark. Thirty three people traveled with them into unknown territory, starting near what is now known as Wood River, Illinois in 1804, reaching the Pacific Ocean in 1805 and returning in 1806.

Theodore Roosevelt National Park - Theodore Roosevelt National Park is in the colorful North Dakota badlands and is home to a variety of plants and animals, including bison, prairie dogs, and elk.

North Country National Scenic Trail - The North Country National Scenic Trail links scenic, natural, historic, and cultural areas in seven northern states. The approximately four thousand mile long trail includes a variety of hikes from easy walking to challenging treks. When completed, through the efforts of many people, the trail will become the longest continuous hiking trail in the United States.

  

 

 

For more information visit the National Park Service website